JMIR AI

A new peer reviewed journal focused on research and applications for the health AI community

Editor-in-Chief:

Khaled El Emam, PhD,  Canada Research Chair in Medical AI, University of Ottawa; Senior Scientist, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute: Professor, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa 

Bradley Malin, PhD, Accenture Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Biostatistics, and Computer Science; Vice Chair for Research Affairs, Department of Biomedical Informatics: Affiliated Faculty, Center for Biomedical Ethics & Society, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee


JMIR AI is a new journal that focuses on the applications of AI in health settings. This includes contemporary developments as well as historical examples, with an emphasis on sound methodological evaluations of AI techniques and authoritative analyses. It is intended to be the main source of reliable information for health informatics professionals to learn about how AI techniques can be applied and evaluated. 

The journal has been approved for indexing in PubMed Central and PubMed and is indexed in DOAJ.

 

Recent Articles

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Artificial Intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) for pain assessment has the potential to address historical challenges in infant pain assessment. There is a dearth of information on the perceived benefits and barriers to the implementation of AI for neonatal pain monitoring in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from the perspective of health care professionals (HCPs) and parents. This qualitative analysis provides novel data obtained from 2 large tertiary care hospitals in Canada and the United Kingdom.

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Artificial Intelligence

Machine learning techniques are starting to be used in various health care data sets to identify frail persons who may benefit from interventions. However, evidence about the performance of machine learning techniques compared to conventional regression is mixed. It is also unclear what methodological and database factors are associated with performance.

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Artificial Intelligence

Amidst the COVID-19 pandemic, misinformation on social media has posed significant threats to public health. Detecting and predicting the spread of misinformation are crucial for mitigating its adverse effects. However, prevailing frameworks for these tasks have predominantly focused on post-level signals of misinformation, neglecting features of the broader information environment where misinformation originates and proliferates.

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Natural Language Processing

Despite its high lethality, sepsis can be difficult to detect on initial presentation to the emergency department (ED). Machine learning–based tools may provide avenues for earlier detection and lifesaving intervention.

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Artificial Intelligence

The evolution of artificial intelligence (AI) has significantly impacted various sectors, with health care witnessing some of its most groundbreaking contributions. Contemporary models, such as ChatGPT-4 and Microsoft Bing, have showcased capabilities beyond just generating text, aiding in complex tasks like literature searches and refining web-based queries.

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Artificial Intelligence

Pancreatic cancer is the third leading cause of cancer deaths in the United States. Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC) is the most common form of pancreatic cancer, accounting for up to 90% of all cases. Patient-reported symptoms are often the triggers of cancer diagnosis and therefore, understanding the PDAC-associated symptoms and the timing of symptom onset could facilitate early detection of PDAC.

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Artificial Intelligence

The integration of artificial intelligence (AI)–based applications in the medical field has increased significantly, offering potential improvements in patient care and diagnostics. However, alongside these advancements, there is growing concern about ethical considerations, such as bias, informed consent, and trust in the development of these technologies.

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Artificial Intelligence

ChatGPT (Open AI) is a state-of-the-art large language model that uses artificial intelligence (AI) to address questions across diverse topics. The American Society of Clinical Oncology Self-Evaluation Program (ASCO-SEP) created a comprehensive educational program to help physicians keep up to date with the many rapid advances in the field. The question bank consists of multiple choice questions addressing the many facets of cancer care, including diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care. As ChatGPT applications rapidly expand, it becomes vital to ascertain if the knowledge of ChatGPT-3.5 matches the established standards that oncologists are recommended to follow.

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Artificial Intelligence

The COVID-19 pandemic drove investment and research into medical imaging platforms to provide data to create artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms for the management of patients with COVID-19. Building on the success of England’s National COVID-19 Chest Imaging Database, the national digital policy body (NHSX) sought to create a generalized national medical imaging platform for the development, validation, and deployment of algorithms.

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Artificial Intelligence

Drug-induced mortality across the United States has continued to rise. To date, there are limited measures to evaluate patient preferences and priorities regarding substance use disorder (SUD) treatment, and many patients do not have access to evidence-based treatment options. Patients and their families seeking SUD treatment may begin their search for an SUD treatment facility online, where they can find information about individual facilities, as well as a summary of patient-generated web-based reviews via popular platforms such as Google or Yelp. Web-based reviews of health care facilities may reflect information about factors associated with positive or negative patient satisfaction. The association between patient satisfaction with SUD treatment and drug-induced mortality is not well understood.

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Artificial Intelligence

The utilization of artificial intelligence (AI) technologies in the biomedical field has attracted increasing attention in recent decades. Studying how past AI technologies have found their way into medicine over time can help to predict which current (and future) AI technologies have the potential to be utilized in medicine in the coming years, thereby providing a helpful reference for future research directions.

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