JMIR AI

A new peer reviewed journal focused on research and applications for the health artificial intelligence (AI) community.

Editor-in-Chief:

Khaled El Emam, PhD,  Canada Research Chair in Medical AI, University of Ottawa; Senior Scientist, Children’s Hospital of Eastern Ontario Research Institute: Professor, School of Epidemiology and Public Health, University of Ottawa, Canada

Bradley Malin, PhD, Accenture Professor of Biomedical Informatics, Biostatistics, and Computer Science; Vice Chair for Research Affairs, Department of Biomedical Informatics: Affiliated Faculty, Center for Biomedical Ethics & Society, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, Tennessee, USA


JMIR AI is a new journal that focuses on the applications of AI in health settings. This includes contemporary developments as well as historical examples, with an emphasis on sound methodological evaluations of AI techniques and authoritative analyses. It is intended to be the main source of reliable information for health informatics professionals to learn about how AI techniques can be applied and evaluated. 

The journal has been approved for indexing in PubMed Central and PubMed and is indexed in DOAJ.

 

Recent Articles

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Tutorial

Synthetic electronic health record (EHR) data generation has been increasingly recognized as an important solution to expand the accessibility and maximize the value of private health data on a large scale. Recent advances in machine learning have facilitated more accurate modeling for complex and high-dimensional data, thereby greatly enhancing the data quality of synthetic EHR data. Among various approaches, generative adversarial networks (GANs) have become the main technical path in the literature due to their ability to capture the statistical characteristics of real data. However, there is a scarcity of detailed guidance within the domain regarding the development procedures of synthetic EHR data. The objective of this tutorial is to present a transparent and reproducible process for generating structured synthetic EHR data using a publicly accessible EHR data set as an example. We cover the topics of GAN architecture, EHR data types and representation, data preprocessing, GAN training, synthetic data generation and postprocessing, and data quality evaluation. We conclude this tutorial by discussing multiple important issues and future opportunities in this domain. The source code of the entire process has been made publicly available.

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Wearable Devices and Sensors

Biobehavioral rhythms are biological, behavioral, and psychosocial processes with repeating cycles. Abnormal rhythms have been linked to various health issues, such as sleep disorders, obesity, and depression.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

The COVID-19 pandemic has led to the rapid proliferation of artificial intelligence (AI), which was not previously anticipated; this is an unforeseen development. The use of AI in health care settings is increasing, as it proves to be a promising tool for transforming health care systems, improving operational and business processes, and efficiently simplifying health care tasks for family physicians and health care administrators. Therefore, it is necessary to assess the perspective of family physicians on AI and its impact on their job roles.

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Artificial Intelligence

Central collection of distributed medical patient data is problematic due to strict privacy regulations. Especially in clinical environments, such as clinical time-to-event studies, large sample sizes are critical but usually not available at a single institution. It has been shown recently that federated learning, combined with privacy-enhancing technologies, is an excellent and privacy-preserving alternative to data sharing.

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Artificial Intelligence

Large curated data sets are required to leverage speech-based tools in health care. These are costly to produce, resulting in increased interest in data sharing. As speech can potentially identify speakers (ie, voiceprints), sharing recordings raises privacy concerns. This is especially relevant when working with patient data protected under the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

Many promising artificial intelligence (AI) and computer-aided detection and diagnosis systems have been developed, but few have been successfully integrated into clinical practice. This is partially owing to a lack of user-centered design of AI-based computer-aided detection or diagnosis (AI-CAD) systems.

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Machine Learning

Identification and referral of at-risk patients from primary care practitioners (PCPs) to eye care professionals remain a challenge. Approximately 1.9 million Americans suffer from vision loss as a result of undiagnosed or untreated ophthalmic conditions. In ophthalmology, artificial intelligence (AI) is used to predict glaucoma progression, recognize diabetic retinopathy (DR), and classify ocular tumors; however, AI has not yet been used to triage primary care patients for ophthalmology referral.

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Clinical Information and Decision Making

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) can revolutionize health care, but this raises risk concerns. It is therefore crucial to understand how clinicians trust and accept AI technology. Gastroenterology, by its nature of being an image-based and intervention-heavy specialty, is an area where AI-assisted diagnosis and management can be applied extensively.

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Machine Learning

Digital diabetes prevention programs (dDPPs) are effective “digital prescriptions” but have high attrition rates and program noncompletion. To address this, we developed a personalized automatic messaging system (PAMS) that leverages SMS text messaging and data integration into clinical workflows to increase dDPP engagement via enhanced patient-provider communication. Preliminary data showed positive results. However, further investigation is needed to determine how to optimize the tailoring of support technology such as PAMS based on a user’s preferences to boost their dDPP engagement.

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Artificial Intelligence

The use of artificial intelligence (AI) for pain assessment has the potential to address historical challenges in infant pain assessment. There is a dearth of information on the perceived benefits and barriers to the implementation of AI for neonatal pain monitoring in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) from the perspective of health care professionals (HCPs) and parents. This qualitative analysis provides novel data obtained from 2 large tertiary care hospitals in Canada and the United Kingdom.

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